Use your stem cells to manage your diabetes


With Regenerative Association, your mesenchymal stem cells (AdMSC) have a promising regenerative role in managing cellular damage from diabetes.

Clinical data analysis suggests that complications from both DM1 and DM2 (types 1 & 2) can safely benefit from AdMSC based therapy; as these stem cells have the ability to mitigate fibrosis, modulate inflammation and promote vascular growth.

Diabetes is manageable with proper medical care; and, some complications of diabetes are reversible using your own stem cells, but no ‘cure’ as such is yet available.

Stem cells as a ‘cure’ to reverse diabetes mellitus type 1 (DM1) have so far proved to be elusive. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) may have a promising regenerative role in managing cellular damage aspects of this autoimmune form of diabetes.

Research suggests that diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM2) may be put into remission via a low-calorie diet, enabling a physician-led DM2 controlled medication reduction programme. This may prove to be a useful DM2 management protocol, if the patient can maintain a balanced dietary lifestyle.

It is common for some people with diabetes to develop complications after a number of years. If the disease is undiagnosed (as is often the case for DM2) or poorly controlled, then serious complications can potentially develop earlier.

Diabetes damages body systems such as blood vessels and nerves. Complications of diabetes include heart and kidney disease, neuropathy, retinopathy; and slow-to-no healing (chronic) wounds such as a diabetic foot ulcer (DFU). Up to 25% of diabetics will have a DFU.

Meta-analysis of the clinical data suggests that both DM1 and DM2 complications arising can safely benefit from AdMSC based therapy; as these stem cells have the ability to mitigate fibrosis, modulate inflammation and promote vascular growth. Useful for those with such endocrine disorders.

Understandably, a DFU is a very much feared complication of diabetes particularly with the ever present spectre of lower limb amputation (LLA) risk, what it entails and the dread prognosis of a 50% probability of a 2nd LLA within 5-years, or death from another complication.

About 50% of DFU heal relatively quickly, however the remainder of wound healing episodes can take months or sometimes years to resolve. Below are images of a DFU that hadn’t healed over four years of wound care. Using a AdMSC based therapy the wound healed (closed) in 10 days.

After a serious non-compliance issue the patient returned with a blister-wound that otherwise would have led to an LLA. The quality of tissue remodelling in the wound locale from the regenerative effect of a first AdMSC based therapy enabled this blister-wound to heal in just 9-days.

An inadequately hospital-managed minor wound manifested to a serious DFU with infection that had penetrated tendon, ligament to the bone. AdMSC based therapy enable possibility a skin graft a month after therapy given tissue regeneration including granular tissue. Return to any hospital for a graft was refused by the patient. Stem cell therapy continued in an outpatients setting until the DFU healed.

An inadequately hospital-managed minor wound manifested to a serious DFU with infection that had penetrated tendon, ligament to the bone. AdMSC based therapy enable possibility a skin graft a month after therapy given tissue regeneration including granular tissue. Return to any hospital for a graft was refused by the patient. Stem cell therapy continued in an outpatients setting until the DFU healed.

Most LLA are performed due to potential sepsis risk, length of a wound episode, and are often self- elected by the patient in the vain hope of a better quality of life post-amputation. However with access to advanced wound care, AdMSC based therapy challenges current DFU protocols for LLA. Even if a complication of diabetes has not yet manifested itself, it makes sense to consider storing your own AdMSC for potential future use if you are diagnosed as diabetic.